Articles and Blog Posts

The Push for a Harassment-Free Comic Con

The awesome folks at Hollaback! Philly are pushing for change at Comic Con. They want to see a more substantial harassment policy, and they want it to be  more visible.

A year ago this week, as the city approached the height of the Bob Filner scandal, the issue of sexual harassment was inescapable.

So it’s almost hard to imagine that a trio of women is in town this week trumpeting the message that San Diegans should be thinking more about sexual harassment. Almost – until you scope the harassment policy for Comic-Con, the mega-event that has brought more than 100,000 to San Diego.

It’s one sentence tucked inside the convention’s Code of Conduct: “Harassing or offensive behavior will not be tolerated” – and until women Comic-Con attendees and journalists started to share their bad experiences publicly, it wasn’t even posted online.

Rochelle Keyhan, Anna Kegler and Erin Filson want to see a more substantial policy put in place – one that Comic-Con makes visible to all attendees.

They run Hollaback Philly, a Philadelphia group that aims to end street harassment – basically any unwanted actions between strangers on the street, including leering, whistling, unwelcome comments and threatening or harassing behavior.

As part of that effort, the trio created a comic book to educate middle- and high-school students about harassment issues. That brought them to a comic book convention, where they encountered a whole new harassment ballgame.

They started to see firsthand how women “cosplayers” – people who wear costumes and dress up as certain characters – were treated at conventions. Think photo galleries of costumed women’s butts and outright groping of women in costumes.

That spurred Geeks for CONsent, the group they run dedicated to stamping out harassment at comic conventions.

San Diego Comic-Con is their white whale, basically.

Read the rest of the piece, including a great interview with Rochelle, Anna, and Erin here.

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Articles and Blog Posts

Street Harassment: Alive and Well in 2014

Over at Everyday Feminism, Alicia Melville-Smith discusses street harassment, her personal experiences, and potential responses:

On my walk to work this morning a man driving past called me a ****.

I know what you must be thinking: what horrible thing had I done to deserve such nasty name-calling?

Was I kicking seagulls as I walked, yelling at children or brandishing an offensive sign?

No, I was just making my way to work as I do most weekday mornings at 6.30am.

My mistake was not to positively acknowledge the wolf whistle the driver of the car directed at me (in the interests of total honesty, I may have given him the finger).

Street harassment, it pains me to say, is still alive and well in 2014.

This morning’s incident was not a one-off. It was not new or unusual. It was just another frustrating example of the unwanted attention directed at women who dare to appear in public.

In the past few weeks I have been whistled and leered at by several drivers while walking the streets of Cardiff.

This morning’s incident left me shaken and angry when I arrived at work and I am fed up.

Street harassment demeans, scares and humiliates women and it happens everywhere.

Read the rest of the piece here

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Your Stories

Harassed by a Sexist Creep in a Bookstore

This story was shared with us by a friend of the woman mentioned in the story, and is shared here with her permission:

A man meets a woman at a bookstore looking at Hillary Clinton’s autobiography. He criticizes her tastes for “supporting a bitch.” She moves away. He follows her. In his continued efforts to woo her, he asserts, sans solicitation, that her “politics are wrong because your hormones make you incapable of logical thought.” She politely indicated she was late to meet her boyfriend and left the area. He waits for her at the cashier, where he hands her a USED and STAINED copy of Hitchens’ “No One Left to Lie To” with the inscription “This will help you think straight–like a man” … with his number inscribed in it. He says “Hopefully this will help you de-bitch because your body’s too fine to waste it on that mind.” Then he winks and says “you’re welcome.”

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Monday Morning Meme

Monday Morning Meme: Adorable French Bulldog Edition

Here is this week’s Monday Morning Meme

 

meme 7

 

Meme from MasculinityU

Have a meme that you’d like us to feature? Email us at twincities@ihollaback.org.

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Articles and Blog Posts

Awesome Anti-Street Harassment Activist Does More Awesome Things

We wrote about this woman’s Craigslist call out of the man who harassed her, as well as the fabulous Cards Against Harassment that she created. Well, now she’s got a YouTube channel where she documents her experiences with street harassment, and her story was recently featured in a BuzzFeed piece!

Here’s one of the YouTube videos from the Cards Against Harassment channel:

YouTube Preview Image

 

Are you fed up with street harassment? Find our how you can get involved to help us end it.

 

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Your Stories

Lyu’s Story: “No matter what I wear, I cannot walk even ONE house over without random guys trying to chat me up”

At the beginning of April this year, my very close roommate and I had to move into a cheap dwelling in North Minneapolis. I’ve been sexually harassed and such since my single-digit years, but I was not prepared for this. It’s not the severity of the harassment now, but the frequency of it. No matter what I wear, I cannot walk even ONE house over without random guys trying to chat me up. I am afraid to leave the house without a taller male friend, day or night.

During the first real heat wave in May, me, my roommate and one of our new housemates decided to go out for a long walk to the park down the road. I wore long pants in an attempt to abate the inevitable harassment, and our housemate went as far as to wear a zipped-up jacket and long pants. It made no difference other than to temp heatstroke. Every single guy standing or walking outside bothered us with the usual “hey baby” “how you doin’?” “where you goin’ girls?” “back dat ass up” “mmmmm, baby girls, take dem hot clothes off”. The three of us ignored all of them and kept talking amongst ourselves. Because of it, a lot of them said things like “ratchet ass hoes” “bitches be frigid”.

I was very upset by this for some time (and still am), and told some of my closer male friends about it. They told me that those guys probably thought we might have nice personalities, were just being nice, and that we should take it as a compliment. One of my friends even said that wearing form-fitting clothes was purposefully inviting strange men to stare at and hit on us. Some of the closest people in my life were making me feel hurt and very alone by saying these things to me. I wish very badly that they could feel what it’s like for themselves.

I still get told on a regular basis that I should leave the house more often.

I've got your back!
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Articles and Blog Posts

What to do when you experience street harassment

Hollaback’s own Debjani Roy is quoted in this Business Insider piece that discusses some ways to respond to street harassment. Check it out: https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/someone-catcalls-street-183106241.html

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Monday Morning Meme

Monday Morning Meme

Here is this week’s Monday Morning Meme

 

meme1meme 5

 

Meme from MasculinityU

Have a meme that you’d like us to feature? Email us at twincities@ihollaback.org.

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