Monday Morning Meme

Monday Morning Meme

 

Here is this week’s Monday Morning Meme

 cat calling phone

Source: http://www.gemmacorrell.com

 

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Articles and Blog Posts

What happens when you confront your catcallers? One woman tells her story

When someone is catcalled, they may choose to ignore the catcaller(s) or respond in some way. In a piece over at YourTango, Danielle talks about her experience responding to catcallers.

I don’t remember the first time I was catcalled.

Maybe it’s because I’m jaded from living and working in NYC, the catcalling capital of the world. Perhaps it’s due to the fact that catcalling becomes a part of a woman’s life so early on that it fades into the part of the memory where those types of meaningless milestones get buried and ultimately forgotten.

When you’re a woman in living in a big city, catcalling very rarely shocks you. Inevitably, it becomes an ever-present part of the background noise of the streets we walk down. We know it’s there, we hear what’s being said, but we keep moving in the hopes that the words somehow won’t touch us if we get far away fast enough.

This past fall, one woman walked the streets of NYC for 10 hours recording the catcalls she received from passersby, and compiled them into a video. She never stops to respond to these men or acknowledges what’s been said. She just keeps her pace as they shout “compliments” at her. As I watched the men in the video, I began to wonder if they’d also have trouble recalling the first time they ever catcalled a woman. How early does it start? Why do they do it? Does it ever work? And what are they getting out of it, anyway?

So during the coldest week of the year thus far, I decided to respond to every catcall that was said to me for a week in order to get to the bottom of these questions.

Read the rest of the piece, including descriptions of her interactions with catcallers, here.

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Monday Morning Meme

Monday Morning Meme

 

Here is this week’s Monday Morning Meme

 Y-u-no-keep-them-to-yourself

 

Do you have a meme or other image that you’d like us to feature?

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Articles and Blog Posts, Tools and Resources

Cool New Project: #WhatmySHSaid

recent GirlsSpeak piece features another great street harassment project, where women submit photos of the words their harasser said to them.

California teen Chloe Parker came up with an idea to help combat the problem of street harassment. On her Instagram, @rebel.grrrl, women from all over the world submit pictures of themselves holding up a piece of paper. The words a street harasser said to them are written on the paper.

The project has helped Chloe, who was first street harassed at the age of 12, feel less alone. “I hope this will open people’s eyes to the trouble women so often face on a daily basis,” she said.

Read the rest of the piece, and find out out how you can submit a photo to the project here.

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Media

New Hollaback! Video

 

Hollaback! released their third in a series of videos about street harassment. Check it out below.

 

 

FAQs (from the Hollaback! post associated with the video)

 

Why did you make this video? We think videos are an awesome tool to raise awareness about the realities of street harassment. This video is the third in a series. Each video aims to explore a different experience with street harassment. The first video, “10 Hours Walking in NYC as a Woman”, demonstrated the sheer number of times women are harassed in public space. The second video, “My Sexual Assault: On the Train and in The Media”, depicted one survivor’s, Elisa’s, experience with street harassment. This third video encourages us to listen to and believe the experiences of each individual.

 

Who created this video? Hollaback! sought out Aden Hakimi to direct this video because of his experience working with a queer filmmaking collective. With Hollaback!’s guidance and feedback, Aden shot and edited the video. He worked closely with Michelle Charles, the supporter in the video, to incorporate her experiences with street harassment into the narrative of the video.

 

Is Michelle’s experience unique? The experience of street harassment is different for everyone.  Street harassment disproportionately impacts women, people of color, LGBTQ individuals, and young people.  These forms of harassment are not just sexist — but also racist and homophobic in nature. For more information on how harassment impacts people differently, please read our guide on street harassment and identity called #harassmentis.

 

What is street harassment? Street harassment is a form of sexual harassment that takes place in public spaces. At its core is a power dynamic that constantly reminds historically subordinated groups (women and LGBTQ folks, for example) of their vulnerability to assault in public spaces. Further, it reinforces the ubiquitous sexual objectification of these groups in everyday life. At Hollaback!, we believe that what specifically counts as street harassment is determined by those who experience it. While there is always the classic, “Hey baby, nice tits!”, there are many other forms that go unnoted. If you feel like you have been harassed, HOLLABACK!

 

So you want to criminalize street harassment, right? No. We believe that it is our role as advocates to steer policy makers away from measures that would increase criminalization, and toward measures that engage communities in prevention.

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Monday Morning Meme

Monday Morning Meme

 

Here is this week’s Monday Morning Meme

 

attractive image

Source: Subversive Kawaii

 

Do you have a meme or other image that you’d like us to feature?

Email us at [email protected]

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Your Stories

Amy’s Story: Harassed in the Skyway

I was walking to get lunch in the skyway when a man came up behind me, touched my back, and said “You’re looking good, baby”. I said “Do I know you?”. He said “I’m Earl, I just wanted to tell you how good you look”. I stopped walking and said “I don’t know you – that’s creepy.” He got angry and said “You know what’s creepy – that you would take that compliment from a woman”. I ran into a nearby business and away from him to escape.

I've got your back!
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